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Covid: UK coronavirus cases pass 10 million and vaccines safe in pregnancy

SharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingHere are five things you need to know about the coronavirus pandemic this Thursday evening. We'll have another update for you tomorrow morning.1. UK coronavirus cases surpass 10 millionThe UK has now recorded more than 10 million coronavirus cases, government data shows. A further 47,240 cases were recorded on Thursday, taking overall cases to 10,021,497, and there were another 147 deaths within 28 days of a positive coronavirus test. The seven-day average for cases is up by 9.5%, though the seven-day average for deaths and patients admitted into hospital is down 14.8% and 11.4% respectively. Look at UK cases here. Image source, PA Media2. Covid vaccines safe in pregnancy, data showsCovid vaccines are safe in pregnancy, new English data has found, backing up international evidence on their safety. The UK's Health Security Agency found similar rates of stillbirths and preterm births for vaccinated and unvaccinated mothers. Its report shows no fully vaccinated pregnant women were admitted to intensive care with the virus between February and September 2021. But just 22% of women who gave birth in August had had at least one jab. Image source, Getty Images3. Rise in deaths among those in drug and alcohol treatmentThere has been a 27% rise in people dying in England while in treatment for drug and alcohol addiction during the pandemic, an official report shows. Between April 2020 and March 2021, 3,726 people died while in contact with drug and alcohol services - up from 2,929 the year before. Changes to support and reduced access to healthcare during lockdowns are likely to have been factors, the report says. Image source, Getty Images4. Family of woman with Covid allowed to appeal against end-of-life rulingRelatives of a woman in her 50s left brain-damaged and paralysed after contracting Covid-19 have been told they can appeal against a ruling that she should be allowed to die. The woman was admitted to Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge in late 2020. A judge had ruled earlier this year that no more could be done for her and life-support treatment should end. Her family challenged that decision and Appeal Court judges have now said the case should be re-heard as soon as possible.5. Christmas parties to be smaller this yearOffice Christmas parties will be smaller this year, the boss of one of the UK's biggest pub groups has predicted. Phil Urban of Mitchells & Butlers, which owns Browns, All Bar One and Harvester, said bookings for Christmas parties were coming in as "people are recognising that actually they missed out last year". But he said it was likely parties would be made up of smaller groups meeting in suburban settings more than in city centres. Analysts have suggested that with more people working from home as a result of the pandemic, many workers may not want to bear the cost of travelling into a city location for a work celebration.Image source, Getty ImagesGet a longer daily news briefing from the BBC in your inbox, each weekday morning, by signing up here.And don't forget... You can find more information, advice and guides on our coronavirus page. For the latest global cases and death rates, click here - or check all the latest in-depth UK data here.Image source, BBC What questions do you have about coronavirus?In some cases, your question will be published, displaying your name, age and location as you provide it, unless you state otherwise. Your contact details will never be published. Please ensure you have read our terms & conditions and privacy policy.Use this form to ask your question: If you are reading this page and can't see the form you will need to visit the mobile version of the BBC website to submit your question or send them via email to YourQuestions@bbc.co.uk. Please include your name, age and location with any question you send in. TRAPPED AS THE WATERS ROSE: What happened when Hurricane Ida hit New York City'BEING A SURGEON SHOWS YOU LIFE IS PRECIOUS': The doctors pushing science - and the human body - to its limits
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Here are five things you need to know about the coronavirus pandemic this Thursday evening. We’ll have another update for you tomorrow morning.

1. UK coronavirus cases surpass 10 million

The UK has now recorded more than 10 million coronavirus cases, government data shows. A further 47,240 cases were recorded on Thursday, taking overall cases to 10,021,497, and there were another 147 deaths within 28 days of a positive coronavirus test. The seven-day average for cases is up by 9.5%, though the seven-day average for deaths and patients admitted into hospital is down 14.8% and 11.4% respectively. Look at UK cases here.

Image source, PA Media

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2. Covid vaccines safe in pregnancy, data shows

Covid vaccines are safe in pregnancy, new English data has found, backing up international evidence on their safety. The UK’s Health Security Agency found similar rates of stillbirths and preterm births for vaccinated and unvaccinated mothers. Its report shows no fully vaccinated pregnant women were admitted to intensive care with the virus between February and September 2021. But just 22% of women who gave birth in August had had at least one jab.

Picture of pregnant lady with mask looking out of window

Image source, Getty Images

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3. Rise in deaths among those in drug and alcohol treatment

There has been a 27% rise in people dying in England while in treatment for drug and alcohol addiction during the pandemic, an official report shows. Between April 2020 and March 2021, 3,726 people died while in contact with drug and alcohol services – up from 2,929 the year before. Changes to support and reduced access to healthcare during lockdowns are likely to have been factors, the report says.

Empty beer bottles

Image source, Getty Images

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4. Family of woman with Covid allowed to appeal against end-of-life ruling

Relatives of a woman in her 50s left brain-damaged and paralysed after contracting Covid-19 have been told they can appeal against a ruling that she should be allowed to die. The woman was admitted to Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge in late 2020. A judge had ruled earlier this year that no more could be done for her and life-support treatment should end. Her family challenged that decision and Appeal Court judges have now said the case should be re-heard as soon as possible.

Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge

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5. Christmas parties to be smaller this year

Office Christmas parties will be smaller this year, the boss of one of the UK’s biggest pub groups has predicted. Phil Urban of Mitchells & Butlers, which owns Browns, All Bar One and Harvester, said bookings for Christmas parties were coming in as “people are recognising that actually they missed out last year”. But he said it was likely parties would be made up of smaller groups meeting in suburban settings more than in city centres. Analysts have suggested that with more people working from home as a result of the pandemic, many workers may not want to bear the cost of travelling into a city location for a work celebration.

Office party

Image source, Getty Images

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And don’t forget…

You can find more information, advice and guides on our coronavirus page. For the latest global cases and death rates, click hereor check all the latest in-depth UK data here.

coronavirus figures

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What questions do you have about coronavirus?

In some cases, your question will be published, displaying your name, age and location as you provide it, unless you state otherwise. Your contact details will never be published. Please ensure you have read our terms & conditions and privacy policy.

Use this form to ask your question:

If you are reading this page and can’t see the form you will need to visit the mobile version of the BBC website to submit your question or send them via email to YourQuestions@bbc.co.uk. Please include your name, age and location with any question you send in.

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